Monthly Archives: August 2013

Dog Food Recall – Purina One Beyond Dog Food

This recall is for one batch of their food, it is a voluntary recall, where the food may have come in contact with salmonella bacteria.  Please read on to find out specific information.

August 30, 2013 – Nestlé Purina PetCare Company of St. Louis, MO has announced it is voluntarily recalling a limited number of 3.5 pound bags of Purina One Beyond due to possible contamination with Salmonella bacteria.
Purina One Beyond Chicken and Barley

Purina One Beyond Our White Meat Chicken and Whole Barley Recipe Adult Dry Dog Food from a single production run was shipped to retail customers in the United States.

Only one bag of the product was found to be contaminated.

No additional Purina or Purina ONE dog or cat products are involved in this recall at this time.

And according to the company, no salmonella-related illness has been reported to date in association with this product.

What’s Being Recalled?

The only product being recalled in this event is Purina ONE beyOnd Our White Meat Chicken & Whole Barley Recipe Adult Dry Dog Food in the 3.5 pound bag size.

The affected product contains both a “Best By” date and production code shown below:

  • Bag Size = 3.5 pounds
  • Best By Date = OCT 2014
  • Production Code = 31071083
  • UPC Code = 17800 12679

The “Best By” Date and the Production Code are found on the back or bottom of the bag.

About Salmonella

Salmonella can affect animals eating the product, and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated products.

People handling contaminated dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may exhibit decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

What to Do?

Consumers who have purchased Purina ONE beyOnd Our White Meat Chicken & Whole Barley Recipe Adult Dry Dog Food products with the specific “Best By” Date and Production Code should discontinue feeding the product and discard it.

For further information or to obtain a product refund, consumers are asked to call Nestle Purina toll-free at 800-473-8546, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Recipe Friday – Lickable Liver Treats For Cats

I may have posted a recipe similar to this before, but I thought I would share a cat treat recipe since I haven’t for a while.  Remember to feed in moderation.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup of chicken livers (fully cooked)
  • ¼ cup of water
  • 1 ¼ cup of whole wheat flour (for gluten free flour choice, you can use 1 cup of rice flour)
  • ¼ cup of pumpkin (just the plain 100% pumpkin out of the can, or if you are ambitious, you can buy a pumpkin and cook it until you can mash it and  use it in this recipe)
  • 1 tablespoon of butter (unsalted or salted)

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 325 and grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or butter.

2.  Combine the flour and butter in a bowl.

3.  Blend the livers and water (in a blender or use a fork to mash well, then add to the flour and butter)

4.  Next, roll the mixture into balls and then cut it up into small, cat bite-size pieces.  Place the pieces on your greased cookie sheet.

5. Bake for 12 minutes, let cool and then serve.  You can keep these in an airtight container for about a week, then freeze.

Medical Benefits of At Home Grooming For Cats

I really enjoyed this article that Isis’ vet sent to me, so I thought I would pass it along to all my cat parents out there:

 

The condition of your cat’s coat and skin is an important feline health indicator. Healthy coats are shiny and smooth, and healthy skin will be supple and clear. While nutrition and health status will influence a cat’s appearance, regular grooming also has an impact. At-home grooming care, including daily brushing, is an important part of feline wellness care.

While most cats are fastidious groomers and rarely require a bath, regular at home grooming, including daily brushing, is still important. Brushing is especially important for long-haired cats, which are more susceptible to tangles and matted fur. Daily brushing is the best way to remove loose hairs. Daily brushing will also help owners who suffer from allergies as regular grooming reduces the amount of hair and pet dander in the home. For people with mild cat allergies, daily brushing may sufficiently reduce airborne feline allergens, making it possible for these individuals to comfortably share a home with cats.

Regular brushing also helps to reduce the amount of hair that cats naturally swallow through self-grooming. This may reduce  the quantity and severity of hairballs.  If pet owners do choose to bathe their cats, choose shampoos that are specially formulated for felines.  Older or obese pets with mobility restrictions may need additional grooming assistance, including at-home baths, if they are unable to fully groom themselves.

Nails should be checked during weekly grooming sessions and trimmed as needed. Cat nails grow differently than dog’s or people’s nails.  Cats shed their nails like a reptile sheds its skin. As cats age, they use scratching posts less, and the nail caps can build up to the point where the nails curl around and penetrate the pads of the feet. Cat nail clippers can be used to trim nails and prevent this from happening.

During at-home grooming, pet owners should also perform a mini-physical on their cat, evaluating the cat’s skin and coat condition, feeling for any lumps and bumps, or noting any painful areas.  While rubbing a cat’s head or scratching the chin, use the forefingers to gently raise the upper lips, checking for abnormal teeth or red gums.  In addition to being a special bonding time for cats and their owners, a feline health assessment during grooming is critical for older cats who are masters at hiding the symptoms of illness. Early diagnosis of health problems starts with proactive at-home care.

Effective at-home grooming starts with the right products. Talk to your veterinarian about what brush is best for your cat; long-haired cats will need a different brush than short-haired cats.

Once you have the right products, brush your cat on a daily basis. Cats prefer routine, which is why your veterinarian may recommend brushing your cat in conjunction with an evening feeding or right before bedtime. If you will also be bathing your cat, ask your veterinarian which shampoo would be best to use.

Source:

Cornell Feline Health Center, “The Special Needs of the Senior Cat.”

Recipe Friday – Fruit and Veggie Peanut Butter Treats For Dogs

Here is a quick and easy treat idea when you don’t have time to spend in the kitchen every day.  Now remember, do NOT use so much peanut butter that it makes it hard for your dog to eat them.  Just use a small amount.

Ingredients:

  • Raw Fruits or veggies that could be vehicles for the peanut butter (examples are: Apples, Carrots, Sweet Potato, Banana)
  • All Natural Peanut Butter

 

Directions:

1. Wash and peel any fruits or veggies you will be using.  You can make some of these treats ahead of time, or just make these as you go.

2. If you want to get fancy, cut up your fruits and veggies into circles or use a cookie cutter for shape ideas.

3. Put small dabs of peanut butter on the top of your treat (if you use circular cookie cutters, just put small dabs at the top of the treat).

4. Serve and store any in the fridge for maybe a day, after that they tend to get brown and are not very appetizing anymore.

Quick and easy!  Enjoy!

 

Recipe Friday – Simple Dog Biscuits

These are quick and easy to make, your dog should jump for joy for these!

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups all purpose flour & additional flour for dusting surface (for gluten free, you can use almond flour or rice flour, about 2 1/2 to 3 cups of either one, just use your judgment to make sure it keeps a doughy consistency).
  • 2 large eggs
  • Something to flavor the biscuits (I used some parsley and some cinnamon).  You can use whatever you want and how much you may want, just make sure it will work with the dough and not make it runny.  I suggest dry ingredients like I used.
  • Approximately 1/3 cup water

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Mix all ingredients in a large bowl, forming a stiff dough with your hands. Add more water if necessary.

3. Dust surface with flour. Using a rolling pin, roll out dough about 1/4 inch thick. Using a cookie cutter, cut into shapes (or use a knife to cut into small strips).

4. Place onto baking sheet sprayed with cooking spray. Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until lightly browned on bottom (tops of treats will not be as browned).

5. Cool on a wire rack & store in an airtight container for several weeks, but make sure before putting them in the container that they are completely cooled.

Dog and Cat Food Recall – Iams and Eukanuba

Iams and Eukanuba are voluntarily recalling some of their food, due to salmonella, here is the release:

August 14, 2013 — The Procter and Gamble Company of Cincinnati, Ohio has announced it is voluntarily recalling specific lots of its dry pet foods because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Iams Recall August 2013

The lots were distributed in the United States and represent about one-tenth of one percent (0.1%) of annual production.

According to the company, no Salmonella-related illnesses have been reported to date in association with these product lots.

The affected products were made during a 10-day window at a single manufacturing site. P&G’s routine testing determined that some products made during this timeframe have the potential for Salmonella contamination.

As a precautionary measure, P&G is recalling the potentially impacted products made during this timeframe.

No other dry dog food, dry cat food, dog or cat canned wet food, biscuits/treats or supplements are affected by this announcement.

What’s Being Recalled?

Iams Eukanuba Recall Lot Numbers

About Salmonella

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

This issue is limited to the specific dry pet food lot codes listed below. This affects roughly one-tenth of one percent (0.1%) of total annual production.

What to Do?

Consumers who purchased a product listed above should stop using and discard the product immediately. You may also contact the company toll-free at 800-208-0172 (Monday through Friday, 9 AM to 6 PM ET).

Or visit their websites at www.iams.com or www.eukanuba.com.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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What To Do When Your Pet Goes On The Carpet?

Here is a great article my  furbabies vet sent me that I thought I would share with you:

 

Painful Urination

Straining to urinate, frequent urination, blood in the urine, and accidents in the house are common symptoms that pet owners report to their veterinarian. Many times the signs come on suddenly, as people find urine spots on the floor, often near the door where the dog goes outside. Cat owners may notice that the urine balls in the litter box are smaller than usual, or they may also see urine spots around the house, often in the corners of rooms.  Painful urination has three main causes in dogs and cats.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

A urinary tract infection (UTI), also commonly called a bladder infection, is by far the most frequent cause of a painful urination. UTI’s can occur in both males and females, but infections in females are more numerous because of the shorter urethra (the tube from the bladder to the outside). To diagnose a bladder infection, your veterinarian will obtain a urine sample, collected in a special way so as not contaminate the sample, for a urinalysis and often a urine culture. E.coli is the most common bacteria causing the problem, but Staph, Proteus, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas can be other types of bacteria causing the infection.  It is believed that pets licking their anal area, then their genital area may be the means of transfer of the bacteria. Pets with extreme weakness or paralysis of the rear legs, diabetic pets, dogs with Cushings, and female dogs with a recessed vaginal opening are prone to UTI’s.

Bladder Stones

Bladder stones are the second most common reason for painful urination. There are five main kinds of urinary stones with struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) being the most common. Other types of stones are calcium oxalate, urate, silica, and cystine.  Struvite stones commonly form secondary to a bacterial infection. The other  stones  form because of different metabolic problems. Many, but not all, stones will show up on abdominal x-rays.  Ultrasound will usually find the other stones.

Surgical removal is usually the treatment of choice for stones; this can quickly relieve the pain the pet is feeling. The main problem with stones is that they often recur. Some dogs have had multiple surgeries for stone removal. Your veterinarian can help to prevent struvite stones by performing urine cultures to monitor for UTI’s. There is also a  special food that may help to prevent struvite stones.  The other types of stones each have their own recommendations for preventing recurrence.

Bladder Tumors

Bladder tumors are the third most common reason for painful urination.  While not common, they do account for 2% of all cancers in dogs; however, they are less common in cats. The vast majority of bladder tumors are a malignancy called transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).  They occur mostly in older pets. Some breeds have a higher rate of TCC, with Scotties having the highest rate since they are 18 to 20 times more likely than the average dog to have a TCC. Other breeds with a higher incidence are Shelties, Beagles, Westies, and Wire Haired Fox Terrier. These tumors cause discomfort because they obstruct the flow of urine. Detection of the tumor is by ultrasound, diagnosis is by surgery and biopsy.

If your pet is showing signs of urinary discomfort by needing to urinate more frequently than normal and straining, if you’re finding urine accidents in the house, or if you see blood in your pet’s urine, then consult with your veterinarian. An examination of your pet and diagnostic tests can determine the cause, and your veterinarian will discuss the necessary treatment with you.

Incontinence in Pets

Incontinence is also very common in dogs, especially middle -aged to older female dogs. This does not cause pain though, unless there is a secondary UTI.  Incontinence causes the dog to leak urine, usually while lying down or sleeping. A small to medium volume of urine will leak out; the dog may not be aware, or you may see her licking her genital area more than normal.  There are many cases where it is confusing whether the pet is suffering from incontinence or one of the bladder diseases. Your veterinarian can help you and your pet sort through this and decide the correct diagnosis and treatment.

Recipe Friday – Frosty Sweet Potato Bones

Here is a great treat that can help beat the heat!

Ingredients:

  • Plain Yogurt
  • Mashed Sweet Potato (Cooked of course)
  • Honey (optional)

*There are no real measurements because it will all depend on what kind of molds you use.  If you can find silicone dog bone molds, this recipe works best with those.

 

Directions:

1. Pour some yogurt in the mold, Freeze it for an hour. (Make a bottom layer, but make it thick enough to hold the sweet potato on top of it, as you will only be adding one more layer of yogurt.  I usually fill up the mold to almost half way filled.)

2. Add the mashed sweet potato on top of the frozen yogurt.

(Optional: for a creamy texture sweet potato, place the sweet potato in a blender first)

3. Add another layer of yogurt. Freeze it for an hour (or longer).

These can stay in the freezer for several weeks to one month.  Feed in moderation.

Recipe Friday – Sweet Potato Beef Cookies For Dogs

Here is a great recipe for your doggie pals.  Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 3 C. of whole wheat flour (regular or white)
  • 3 tbsp. of olive oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1 jar of beef and gravy baby food (organic if possible)
  • 1 jar of sweet potato baby food (organic if possible)
  • 1/4 C. milk
  • 1/4 C. water

*If your dog cannot eat beef, you can substitute for chicken baby food.

Directions

1. Preheat oven 350 degrees.

2. Mix flour, egg, olive oil, baby food, milk, and water together. Dough should be stiff.

3. Roll the dough into a 1/2-inch-thick roll. Using any small cookie cutters, cut into 1/2-inch pieces.

4. Bake for 20 minutes.

Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 month.  Make sure before putting them in the container, they are COMPLETELY cooled.  If not, condensation that forms in the container can mold the cookies and then they must be discarded.