Blog Archives

Dog Treat Recall – Jump Your Bones Treats

Please read on about this recall due to salmonella:

Contact:
Consumer:
(888) 249-6755

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – December 31, 2014 – Jump Your Bones, Inc. of Boca Raton, Florida is voluntarily recalling Jump Your Bones brand name Roo Bites (Cubes) because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. No pet or consumer illnesses from this product have been reported to date.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever, and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

The affected lots of Jump Your Bones Pet Treats were distributed to retail pet food stores nationwide and through pet food retailers/distributors.

The affected products are sold in Boutique Bags and online stores. The products affected by this recall are only identified with the following UPC codes:

63633010041 for 80g. / 2.82oz. including samples of .32 oz.

This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Consumers who have purchased the above product of Jump Your Bones, Inc. pet treats are urged to stop feeding them and return product to place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them immediately. For further information about the recall please call (888) 249-6755 from Monday – Friday 9am – 5PM EST.

Dog Treat Recall – Barkworthies Dog Treats

Please read on about this recall due to salmonella:

December 24, 2014 — Barkworthies of Richmond, VA is recalling select lots of Barkworthies Chicken Vittles dog chews because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.
Barkworthies Chicken Vittles Dog Treats Recall

What’s Recalled?

The product was distributed nationwide beginning May 6, 2014 and can be identified by its Lot Code found on the side of the plastic pouch.

Barkworthies Chicken Vittles
Lot Code: 1254T1
Size: 16 oz. Plastic Pouch
Best Used by Date: May 2016
UPC: 816807011510

What Caused This Recall?

The recall was initiated after routine testing by the Colorado Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of Salmonella
in a single lot of the product.

This batch tested negative by a third party independent laboratory prior to release for distribution to consumers.

No additional products are affected by this recall.

The company has received no reports of illness in either people or animals associated with these products to date.

About Salmonella

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Fever

Salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, be sure to contact your veterinarian.

What to Do?

The recalled product should not be sold or fed to pets.

For a full refund, pet owners should return all unused product to their place of purchase along with a completed Product Recall Claim Form available on the Barkworthies website.

Additional information regarding the recall can also be found on the company’s website — or call toll free 877-993-4257 Monday thru Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm ET.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

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Dog/Cat Food Recall – Pro-Pet LLC

Here is another recall for salmonella, on Pro-Pet LLC dog food from St. Marys, Ohio. There are a few cat food batches that are being recalled as well. Please read on:

 

February 5, 2014 – Pro-Pet LLC of St. Marys, Ohio has announced a voluntary recall of a limited number of dry dog and cat foods for possible Salmonella contamination.

Pro-Pet LogoAccording to the FDA, a single field test indicated products manufactured during a two-day period and on the same line of production may have the potential to contain the bacteria.

There have been no reports of illness related to this product to date.

What’s Being Recalled?

The three affected brands include:

  • Hubbard Life
  • Joy Combo
  • QC Plus

Pro-Pet Dog Food Recall Lot Numbers

No other products or lot numbers are affected by this recall.

Where Were the Products Distributed?

These products were distributed through select stores, distributors and on-line retailers in:

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Iowa
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kentucky
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Nebraska
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin
  • West Virginia

About Salmonella

Salmonella can affect animals eating the product, and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated products.

People handling contaminated dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may exhibit decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

What to Do?

Customers should immediately discontinue use of any recalled product.

For more information, customers can contact the Pro-Pet customer service line at 888-765-4190. Representatives will be available Monday through Friday 8 am to 5 pm CT.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Catnip: Why Cats Love It

Here is an article that Isis vet shared with me.  Enjoy!

Few things stimulate a cat’s pleasure faster than catnip. Exposure to this simple herb can reveal a new side to their feline personality. Many cats will go crazy at the smell of this plant.

Catnip has a reputation of being a feline drug and many cat owners wonder if it is safe to give it to their pet. Giving catnip in small doses does no harm. Using it as a treat can be quite good for your cat’s emotional health. It relieves stress and can help them get rid of nervous energy.

What Is Catnip?

Catnip is a type of mint plant found  in many countries throughout the world. It can grow up to three feet high and has many branches filled with purple flowers and heart shaped leaves.

The catnip plant has an aromatic oil called nepetalactone. When cats smell this compound, it triggers the part of the feline brain that responds to happy pheromones. This is why cats react the way they do.

Many cats seem to go crazy when they smell catnip by rolling, rubbing and running around. Eating catnip seems to produce the opposite effect. Cats often become mellow when they ingest the plant. This response to catnip usually lasts up to 10 minutes before the cat loses interest.

Catnip as a Training Tool

Creative cat owners can use catnip as a reward or incentive to promote good behavior in their felines. Rubbing dried catnip on a scratching post or cat tree can entice your cat to go there when they need to sharpen their claws instead of tearing your couch to shreds.

Lacing a cat toy with some catnip can be beneficial for inducing an indoor cat to exercise. It will encourage them to be more active and play and prevent obesity. These cat toys should be stored in an airtight container when not in use, so the catnip stays fresh longer.

Growing Catnip

You can grow your own catnip plants in a home garden. You can buy more mature plants from a nursery or plant the seeds after the last major frost of the season. It is important to put the plant in an area where it has plenty of room to grow. Take steps to protect the growing plant from your cat so they don’t tear it out of the soil before it is fully mature.

Is Catnip Right for Your Cat?

Catnip does not have the same effect on every feline. Some cats don’t care about it at all.

The love of this plant is inherited, so only 50 to 70 percent of cats respond to catnip. Kittens typically ignore it until they are three to six months old.

Catnip is non-toxic but cat owners should use caution in giving it out too often. Some cats exhibit aggressive behavior when exposed to catnip and should not have it under any circumstances.

Consult your veterinarian if you notice problematic behavior when your feline uses catnip.

 

Sources:

“Catnip Confidential,” Veterinary Practice News. February 1, 2012.

Dog Treat Recall – True Raw Choice Pet Treats

Instead of a recipe, I have another recall.  These are from Canada, they are being recalled due to salmonella bacteria.  Even though they are from Canada, some people may have bought them and brought them to the US, or various other reasons.  I also want to make sure my Canadian readers are kept up to date.  Please read on:

November 20, 2013 — Health Canada has announced Your True Companion Pet Products is recalling its True Raw Choice Bulk Dehydrated Natural Pet Treats due to possible contamination with Salmonella bacteria.

True Raw Choice Pet TreatsRecalled products include:

  • Duck Feet (Lot 228870)
  • Duck Wings (Lot 213825)
  • Chicken Feet (Lot 214733)
  • Lamb Trachea (Lot 225215)
  • Chicken Breast (Lot 154339)

A total of 280 total cases of the affected treats were sold in bulk at various pet food stores across Canada.

Editor’s Note: Even though the recalled products may have been purchased in Canada, they may also have been carried home to pets in the United States. So, be sure to check your own records for purchase information.

About Salmonella

Pets such as dogs and cats (and their food) can carry Salmonella bacteria. People can get infected with the bacteria from handling pets, pet food or feces.

Symptoms of salmonellosis often include:

  • Sudden onset of fever
  • Stomach cramps
  • Headache
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting

What to Do?

Consumers should contact Your True Companion Pet Products at 855-260-5024 if unsure if the product you have is affected or not.

As of November 8, 2013, all affected products have been disposed of in the market place.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Delivered to You by Email

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FDA Finds Harmful Bacteria In Some Raw Pet Food Samples

This is a short post today.  I will link to the article.  It is an interesting read.  Take the time to read and comment on the article on the site if you wish.  Draw your own conclusions and see where you stand with this issue.

Here is the article.

Lumps and Bumps

Here is an article that Isis’ vet shared with me.  Please read on:

When was the last time your pet visited the veterinarian? If you answered “not in a while,” it is time to book your next appointment. Have you recently discovered a lump or bump on your pet? Don’t let that new discovery go unexamined.  While it may be completely benign, it is essential for your pet’s health to make an appointment with your veterinarian soon after discovery. Ruling out health concerns such as tumors, cysts, and infections will help to keep your pet healthy.

Discovering and Diagnosing Lumps and Bumps

Without regular veterinary visits, subtle illnesses such as pet lumps and bumps can go unnoticed and develop into more serious health concerns such as cancers, arthritic conditions, and infections. When you brush and groom your pet, feel around behind ears, along the neckline, underneath their bellies and along legs and joints for wounds, lumps, and bumps.

Your groomer can help discover things you may miss. Furrier animals can hide lumps and bumps for a long time without anyone noticing until the animal becomes sick. While many pet owners consider grooming a pampering ritual for pets, it could be life-saving, especially when you choose a groomer who works in an environment with a veterinarian on site.

What to Look for on Your Pet

There are many types of masses, but a lipoma is the most common lump found on pets. This soft, round or flat, and painless lump presents just under your pet’s skin and is generally benign, although, rarely a liposarcoma is found. More of a problem though, is that mast cell tumors, a type of skin cancer, can look and feel just like a lipoma.  Because of this, it is always best for your pet’s overall wellness to have these lumps and bumps accurately evaluated and diagnosed.

Occasionally benign masses can grow into other surrounding tissues. While the actual lump itself is not a concern, the tissue it can disrupt sometimes is problematic. The mass may affect the way a limb moves, or an eyelid closes. In some cases lumps must be removed surgically, and removing them early is the key.

Talk to Your Veterinarian

Have you been maintaining your pet’s preventive care visits? If your pet has not been receiving annual examinations, now is the time to do so,  to ensure optimal health for your pet.

While many lumps and bumps are benign, some can present serious health implications for your pet.

Wouldn’t you want to know if something was getting in the way of your pet’s health?

 

Sources:
Goodman Lee, Jessica, “Lumps & Bumps: Team Training Plan.” Veterinary Team Brief, 2013

Nothing Heartwarming About Heartworm

I wanted to share an article Sasha’s vet sent to me:

Heartworm is a long, string-like parasitic worm that has the scientific name Dirofilaria immitis. It earns its common name by living in the host’s heart, lungs, and blood vessels. Heartworm can cause severe lung disease, heart failure, organ damage, and death. It is transmitted only through mosquitoes to a variety of species including dogs, cats, ferrets, wolves, foxes, ferrets, sea lions, and in rare instances, humans. Heartworm can affect any breed of dog or cat.

Heartworm infects animals all over the world. Once inside an animal, a heartworm can live five to seven years, and grow up to twelve inches long. Adult heartworms look like strands of cooked spaghetti.

Mosquitoes spread heartworm to the host animal.  When a mosquito bites the animal, it transmits infected larvae through the bite wound. Once inside an animal, it takes six or seven months for the larvae to mature into adult heartworms. These adult heartworms mate and the females release the offspring, called microfilariae, into the host animal’s bloodstream. Mosquitoes then ingest these microfilariae when they bite the infected animal, completing the lifecycle of heartworm.

The parasite lives  inside a mosquito, and develops into infective larvae in 10 to 14 days. Microfilariae cannot become infective larvae without first passing through a mosquito. This means heartworm is spread  only through mosquito bites and not by casual contact.

The presence of the parasites inside the heart and lungs causes a large degree of inflammation, and can severely interfere with blood flow. This can cause coughing, asthma -like signs, heart failure, weight loss, fluid build-up in the abdomen, or sudden death. If  your pet develops heartworm, your veterinarian will do tests including chest x-rays and blood tests  to determine how seriously it is affected.  Treatment includes doxycycline and an injectable drug named Immiticde ℞ which is derived from arsenic. The treatment takes several months, and can also cause side effects.

For all these reasons,  it is much better to just prevent heartworm in the first place.

What Can I Do to Prevent Heartworm?

Luckily, there are several excellent heartworm preventatives available. Before starting preventative treatment in the dog though, a veterinarian will do a blood test to check for adult heartworms.  If a dog is given the preventative medicine but it already has the infection, there can be a reaction that may be severe, even possibly fatal. So it is mandatory that all dogs be checked for the disease before starting any preventative.   Also, several organizations, including the American Heartworm Society, recommend that dogs be tested annually for heartworm, and remain on the preventative medicine year round.

There are many brands of oral monthly preventatives, two types of topical monthly preventatives, and an injectable medication which is given every six months.   All these medications  are by prescription only.

If you have concerns, make an appointment to speak to your veterinarian about testing, prevention or treatment. Your veterinarian is a local expert at preventing and treating heartworm.

Sources:

American Heartworm Society

Recipe Friday – Gluten/Wheat Free Pizza Treats For Dogs

Here is a great treat, with a Hawaiian theme just for your dog:

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup chopped Ham, cooked
  • 1/4 cup shredded Mozzarella Cheese
  • 1 (20 ounce can) crushed Pineapple in water, drained
  • 1 (6 ounce can) Tomato Paste (make SURE the only ingredient in this is Tomatoes so that the recipe stays dog friendly)
  • 1/2 tablespoon dried Parsley
  • 2 1/4 cup Brown Rice Flour

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.

2. In a large bowl add all ingredients and mix well.

3. Knead dough into ball and roll onto a heavily floured surface, the dough is sticky, roll until the dough is 1/4 inch thick. Cut into squares (as if you are cutting a small square pizza into small square pieces).

4. Place on prepared baking sheet and bake for 10 to 15 minutes.

Can make up to 3 to 4 dozen treats.

Cool and refrigerate. You can place leftovers into ziploc bags and store them that way in the fridge for a week, then freeze if you have more left over.

 

What To Do When Your Pet Goes On The Carpet?

Here is a great article my  furbabies vet sent me that I thought I would share with you:

 

Painful Urination

Straining to urinate, frequent urination, blood in the urine, and accidents in the house are common symptoms that pet owners report to their veterinarian. Many times the signs come on suddenly, as people find urine spots on the floor, often near the door where the dog goes outside. Cat owners may notice that the urine balls in the litter box are smaller than usual, or they may also see urine spots around the house, often in the corners of rooms.  Painful urination has three main causes in dogs and cats.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

A urinary tract infection (UTI), also commonly called a bladder infection, is by far the most frequent cause of a painful urination. UTI’s can occur in both males and females, but infections in females are more numerous because of the shorter urethra (the tube from the bladder to the outside). To diagnose a bladder infection, your veterinarian will obtain a urine sample, collected in a special way so as not contaminate the sample, for a urinalysis and often a urine culture. E.coli is the most common bacteria causing the problem, but Staph, Proteus, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas can be other types of bacteria causing the infection.  It is believed that pets licking their anal area, then their genital area may be the means of transfer of the bacteria. Pets with extreme weakness or paralysis of the rear legs, diabetic pets, dogs with Cushings, and female dogs with a recessed vaginal opening are prone to UTI’s.

Bladder Stones

Bladder stones are the second most common reason for painful urination. There are five main kinds of urinary stones with struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) being the most common. Other types of stones are calcium oxalate, urate, silica, and cystine.  Struvite stones commonly form secondary to a bacterial infection. The other  stones  form because of different metabolic problems. Many, but not all, stones will show up on abdominal x-rays.  Ultrasound will usually find the other stones.

Surgical removal is usually the treatment of choice for stones; this can quickly relieve the pain the pet is feeling. The main problem with stones is that they often recur. Some dogs have had multiple surgeries for stone removal. Your veterinarian can help to prevent struvite stones by performing urine cultures to monitor for UTI’s. There is also a  special food that may help to prevent struvite stones.  The other types of stones each have their own recommendations for preventing recurrence.

Bladder Tumors

Bladder tumors are the third most common reason for painful urination.  While not common, they do account for 2% of all cancers in dogs; however, they are less common in cats. The vast majority of bladder tumors are a malignancy called transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).  They occur mostly in older pets. Some breeds have a higher rate of TCC, with Scotties having the highest rate since they are 18 to 20 times more likely than the average dog to have a TCC. Other breeds with a higher incidence are Shelties, Beagles, Westies, and Wire Haired Fox Terrier. These tumors cause discomfort because they obstruct the flow of urine. Detection of the tumor is by ultrasound, diagnosis is by surgery and biopsy.

If your pet is showing signs of urinary discomfort by needing to urinate more frequently than normal and straining, if you’re finding urine accidents in the house, or if you see blood in your pet’s urine, then consult with your veterinarian. An examination of your pet and diagnostic tests can determine the cause, and your veterinarian will discuss the necessary treatment with you.

Incontinence in Pets

Incontinence is also very common in dogs, especially middle -aged to older female dogs. This does not cause pain though, unless there is a secondary UTI.  Incontinence causes the dog to leak urine, usually while lying down or sleeping. A small to medium volume of urine will leak out; the dog may not be aware, or you may see her licking her genital area more than normal.  There are many cases where it is confusing whether the pet is suffering from incontinence or one of the bladder diseases. Your veterinarian can help you and your pet sort through this and decide the correct diagnosis and treatment.