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Dog Treat Recall – Nutri-Vet Chicken Jerky

Yet another dog treat recall.  It is voluntary:

February 20, 2013 – According to an FDA bulletin, Nutri-Vet, LLC. of Boise, Idaho, is voluntarily recalling its Nutri-Vet and NutriPet Chicken Jerky treats products because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.
Nutri-Vet Chicken Jerky Dog Treats

Salmonella can sicken animals that eat these products.

Humans are at risk for Salmonella poisoning from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not washed their hands thoroughly enough after having contact with affected items.

Or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Fever

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these symptoms after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has any of these signs, please contact your veterinarian.

What’s Being Recalled?

Nutri-Vet is recalling the lot numbers below because the producer of an ingredient used in the products below informed the company of the possibility of the presence of Salmonella at the manufacturing facility.

According to the report, no positive test results have been found on Nutri-Vet or NutriPet products to date.

The recalled Chicken Jerky Treats were distributed nationwide through online sales and in retail stores from April 2012 through February 2013 with Best By Dates ranging from April 20, 2014, through October 3, 2014.

The product comes in a clear plastic bag containing Chicken Jerky Treats as described below:

Nutri-Vet Chicken Jerky Dog Treats Recall

The U.S. based supplier has ceased the production and distribution of the ingredient supplied to Nutri-Vet. The FDA and the manufacturer continue their investigation into the source of the contamination.

No other products made by Nutri-Vet are included in the recall.

What to Do?

Consumers who have purchased Nutri-Vet and NutriPet Chicken Jerky Products are urged to stop feeding them to pets and return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact Nutri-Vet at (877) 729-8668 Monday thru Friday from 7am to 5pm MDT.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Dog Treat Recalls – IMS Trading Group and Publix Chicken Jerky

Instead of the product review I was going to do today, there are two new voluntary recalls.  Read on please:

January 9, 2013 – IMS Trading Corp has announced it is voluntarily withdrawing its Cadet Brand Chicken Jerky Treat products sold in the United States until further notice.
Cadet Brand Chicken Jerky Treats

The Company is taking this action after learning this week the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets found traces of antibiotic residue in samples of Cadet brand Chicken Jerky Treat products.

These antibiotics are approved for use in poultry in China and other major countries, but are not among those approved in the U.S.

According to the company, Cadet Brand Chicken Jerky Treats are safe to feed as directed and have not been linked to any illnesses in dogs or humans.

However, the company claims that…

“…due to regulatory inconsistencies among countries, the presence of antibiotic residue is technically considered an adulteration in the United States.”

At first, New York State authorities requested that IMS Trading Corp remove Cadet Brand Chicken Jerky treats from retail locations only in the state of New York.

Because of this request, the company has decided to conduct a voluntary withdrawal of these chicken treat products nationwide.

According to a statement by IMS Trading Corp…

“A double testing program is being established to check for these antibiotics in China (point of origin) and the United States before we consider to sell these products in the future.

“Testing will be based on a scientifically sound statistical sampling program.”

The announcement goes on to read…

“There is no indication that the trace amounts of antibiotic residue are linked to the FDA’s ongoing investigation of chicken jerky products.

“The trace amounts of antibiotic residue (in the parts-per-billion range) do not pose a health or pet safety risk.”

What to Do

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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January 11, 2013 – Publix Super Markets of Lakeland, FL has today issued a voluntary recall for Publix Chicken Tenders Dog Chew Treats because it may contain trace amounts of antibiotic residue.
Publix Logo

The UPC — located on the back right-hand corner of the product — is #41415-18527 and is sold in a 3.5 ounce bag.

Where the Product Was Sold

This product was sold in Publix Grocery Stores in these states:

  • Florida
  • Alabama
  • Georgia
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee

What to Do

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Dog Treat Recall Alert – Milo’s Kitchen and Waggin Train

Two separate recalls this time, they are voluntary.  Read on to find out if it affects you and your furbaby:

January 9, 2013 – Milo’s Kitchen today announced it is voluntarily recalling its Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers home-style dog treats from retailer shelves nationally.
Milo's Kitchen Chicken Jerky Dog Treats

No other Milo’s Kitchen products are affected.

On Monday, New York State’s Department of Agriculture informed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the company that trace amounts of residual antibiotics had been found in several lots of Milo’s Kitchen Chicken Jerky.

After consultation with the New York Department of Agriculture and the FDA, the company decided to voluntarily recall Milo’s Kitchen Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers, which are both sourced from the same chicken suppliers.

The use of antibiotics to keep chickens healthy and disease-free while raising them is standard practice in poultry production for both human and pet food.

However, the antibiotics found in the products were unapproved and should not be present in the final food product.

Milo’s Kitchen has a comprehensive safety testing program in place for its products from procurement through manufacturing and distribution.

Part of that program involves extensive testing for a wide range of substances commonly used to ensure the health of chickens.

However, Milo’s Kitchen did not test for all of the specific antibiotics found by the New York Department of Agriculture.

What to Do

The company states:

“Consumers who discard the treats will receive a full refund. We are committed to Milo’s Kitchen and stand by our guarantee of complete consumer satisfaction.”

Consumers with questions about Milo’s Kitchen products can get further information by calling 877-228-6493.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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January 9, 2013 – Nestlé Purina PetCare Company of St. Louis, MO has today announced it is voluntarily withdrawing its Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch dog treats sold in the U.S. until further notice.
Waggin Train Chicken Jerky Treats Logo
The company is taking this action after learning this week that the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) found trace amounts of antibiotic residue in samples of Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch chicken jerky products.

These antibiotics are approved for use in poultry in China and other major countries, but are not among those approved in the U.S.

Antibiotics are commonly used globally – including in the United States – when raising animals fit for human consumption.

According to the company, Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch products are safe to feed as directed.

However, due to regulatory inconsistencies among countries, the presence of antibiotic residue is technically considered an adulteration in the United States.

The company claims this finding does not pose a safety risk to pets.

New York State authorities initially requested that the Company remove Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch chicken jerky treats from retail locations in the state of New York, which we have agreed to do.

In addition, due to the differences in U.S. and Chinese regulations, Nestlé Purina decided to conduct a nationwide voluntary withdrawal.

Nestlé Purina contacted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding NYSDAM’s findings.

There is no indication that the trace amounts of antibiotic residue are linked to the FDA’s ongoing investigation of chicken jerky products. The trace amounts of antibiotic residue (in the parts-per-billion range) do not pose a health or pet safety risk.

No other Purina treats or pet food products are affected by this withdrawal. In addition, Canyon Creek Ranch dog and cat foods, which are manufactured in the United States, are not included in this withdrawal.

What to Do

For product refund or more information call the Nestle Purina Office of Consumer Affairs at 800-982-0704. Or go to http://www.waggintrainbrand.com.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Dog Treat Recall – Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Treats

Here is an e-mail I received regarding this recall and I am sharing it with you.  This is an expansion to the October 2012 recall of this brand:

December 6, 2012 – The Food and Drug Administration is warning pet owners and caretakers not to feed their animals certain lots of Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Dog Treats because they may be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.

Photo Image of Nature's Deli Chicken Jerky Dog TreatsThe affected products include packages with a lot code of BESTBY061913DEN.

Today’s FDA warning is an expansion of the recall posted by The Dog Food Advisor in early October.

The treats are made and distributed in the U. S. by Kasel Associates Industries Inc. and were sold at Costco stores in the Denver, Colorado area.

Although Kasel has declined to perform a voluntary recall at this time, Costco is working with FDA and has removed all of the affected products from its shelves.

The company will also contact customers who may have purchased the product to provide additional instructions.

What’s Being Recalled?

The product is sold in 3 pound packages labeled as Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Dog Treats. The package also includes a digital photo of a dog on the front panel and transparent sections to view the product within.

The lot code can be found on the reverse side of the package in the transparent section following the phrase “All American Dog.”

Why the Product Is Being Recalled

In September 2012, a retail sample of a Kasel dog treat product was tested by the Colorado Department of Agriculture and found to be positive for Salmonella.

An FDA follow-up inspection at the firm found certain finished dog treat products and 34 out of 72 environmental samples positive for Salmonella.

On October 2, 2012, the company recalled one lot of its Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Dog Treats. However that recall did not extend to the lot code covered by this warning.

In November 2012, a retail sample of Nature’s Deli Chicken Jerky Dog Treats taken by the Colorado Department of Agriculture tested positive for Salmonella.

These treats are manufactured in the United States and are not associated with FDA’s investigation in reports of illnesses in dogs associated with consumption of chicken jerky treats.

FDA has not received any reports of illnesses associated with these treats.

According to the FDA…

Pets with Salmonella infections may become lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may experience only a decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed any of the affected product or is experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.

As with humans, dogs who are elderly, very young or have impaired immune systems are more vulnerable to Salmonella infection.

What to Do

Consumers should dispose of these products in ways that people and animals, including wild animals, cannot access them, such as placing them in a securely lidded garbage can.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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