Blog Archives

Dog Treat Recall – PetSmart Recalls Simply Nourish treats by Loving Pets Corp

Please read the following voluntary recall:

October 7, 2014 — PetSmart has announced that Loving Pets Corp is voluntarily recalling specific lots of Simply Nourish Biscotti with Beef and Sweet Potatoes Dog Treats due to the potential of mold growth.
PetSmart Logo

The affected products have the expiration date of February 2016. No product images were provided.

No other Simply Nourish or Loving Pets treats are affected.

What’s Being Recalled?

Simply Nourish Dog Treats Batch Info Table

What to Do?

The company recommends that consumers immediately stop using the specified product and return it to any PetSmart store for a full refund.

You are also advised to bring your receipt with you to the store when requesting a refund.

Questions regarding any personal or pet health concerns should be directed to your health care provider or veterinarian.

For any additional questions related to this recall, you may call the Loving Pets Corporation at 866-599-7387.

U.S. citizens can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Canadians can report any health or safety incidents related to the use of this product by filling out the Consumer Product Incident Report Form.

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Dog Food Recall – Wellness Dry Dog Food(Batch)

It’s pretty scary, but there is another recall for Wellness, a batch of dry dog food.  Here is the e-mail I received:

October 30, 2012 – WellPet LLC of Tewksbury, MA has announced the withdrawal of a limited number of one of its dry kibble products due to possible moisture contamination.

This action affects Wellness Small Breed Adult Health Dry Dog Food in the 12 lbs package and bearing a “Best By” date of August 18, 2013.

No other dates, bag sizes or recipes are affected.

According to a statement made by the company on its Facebook page…

“A small batch of the product with this specific date code was found to be higher in moisture than our recipe calls for. High moisture may cause food to mold before its expiration date, but poses no health risk.”

What to Do?

As far as what to do with your affected product, the company goes on to state:

“We want you and your pet to be completely satisfied, so we are asking those who may have this limited supply of food to contact us for a replacement.”

Consumers with questions may call Wellness Customer Service at 800-225-0904.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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How Safe is Your Dog’s Food

Sasha’s vet shared this article with me and I wanted to pass it along, considering all the pet food recalls lately:

How Safe is Your Dog’s Food?

 

dog_food_200.jpg
My dog’s food was recalled – what should I do now?
1. Immediately stop feeding your dog the recalled food; save a small sample of the food and the barcode label in case government regulators need to test the food.

2. Disinfect everything, including your dog’s food bowl, food storage container and feeding space with bleach and hot, soapy water.

3. Immediately take your dog to your veterinarian for a wellness exam, even if your dog does not show symptoms of food poisoning. In some cases, internal organ damage can accumulate slowly over time; early intervention is essential to protecting your pet’s health.

Over the last several years, numerous dog food brands and treats have been recalled for chemical contamination or Salmonella. This last summer many dog food brands were recalled due to Salmonella; all were manufactured in a Diamond Pet Foods plant in Gaston, South Carolina, USA. This plant makes many brands besides their own Diamond brand; Solid Gold, Canidae, Taste of the Wild, and Kirkland (Costco’s brand) were just some of the types of food affected. Further investigation showed that problems extended back to October 2011.  By July 2012, at least 49 people had been sickened from the Salmonella in the dog food, and ten had been hospitalized. Salmonella can cause illness in dogs as well, such as vomiting and diarrhea. It is not known how many pets were affected from this infection.  And like humans, some dogs and cats may not show any symptoms, but become carriers of Salmonella and can infect other animals and people.

An even larger problem is the chicken jerky treats made in China. It has been known for a few years that  many dogs have been sickened from them, and the number of cases is increasing. The FDA just reported that in the last 18 months, 360 dogs and one cat have died from ingesting them. Extensive analysis has not revealed the cause. They have been tested for several chemical compounds including melamine, heavy metals, pesticides, and other toxins and infectious agents. The warning has now been extended to duck and sweet potato jerky treats.

For pet owners and veterinarians, there’s nothing quite as scary as discovering the food that you feed your dog is actually making him or a human family member sick. While you can’t prevent your pet’s food from being recalled, you can take the following five steps to reduce the risk for food poisoning and contamination or at least document a problem.

1. Store food in an airtight container. Before adding a new bag of food to the container, thoroughly wash it out with soap and hot water.

2. Save the barcode. Cut the barcode off your dog’s current food bag. Oftentimes a brand will only recall certain bags of food, depending on where they were manufactured. This information is contained in the barcode.

3. Wash bowls and food space regularly, and then disinfect them in bleach.   If dry dog food falls on the floor, treat it the same as you would raw meat or chicken; clean the floor immediately with antibacterial spray.

4. Watch for symptoms. If you notice a change in your pet’s behavior and energy levels, contact your veterinarian. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. It is always possible that your dog’s food may be making him sick but it has not officially been recalled.

5. Practice good hygiene. When feeding your dog, it’s natural to reach down and pick up fallen pieces of food off the floor and put them back in your pet’s bowl. If the food is contaminated with E. coli or salmonella, however, then doing so will spread these dangerous bacteria to your hands. Always wash your hands with soap and water after feeding your dog; never touch your eyes, ears or mouth with unwashed hands.

If you suspect that your dog’s food is making him sick, contact your veterinarian and government regulators. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) formally tracks complaints about suspect dog food and treats. You can contact the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator.

Source:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

KTLA 5 News

Dog Treats Recall – Boots and Barkley Pig Ears and Dog Treats

Is there anything safe anymore? Another recall has been announced.  I am sharing the e-mail I received.  If you want to receive these alerts, there is a link at the bottom of this recall notice:

October 17, 2012 – Kasel Associated Industries of Denver, CO is voluntarily recalling its Boots and Barkley Roasted American Pig Ears and American Variety Pack Dog Treats product because it may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The event was reported by the FDA in a news release dated October 17, 2012.

According to the FDA bulletin:

Salmonella can sicken animals that eat these products and humans are at risk for salmonella poisoning from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the pet products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these symptoms after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.

Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has any of these signs, please contact your veterinarian.

According to the bulletin, the affected Roasted Pig Ears and Variety Pack Dog Treats were distributed nationwide through Target Stores in August 2012.

What Products Are Being Recalled?

The recalled Roasted Pig Ears product comes in a clear plastic bag containing 12 pig ears marked with UPC bar code 647263899158.

The Variety Pack Dog Treats product also comes in a clear plastic bag weighing 32oz and marked with UPC bar code 490830400086.

Kasel Industries is recalling lot number BESTBY 13SEP2014DEN for both products because this lot code tested positive for the Salmonella bacteria through analysis by the Colorado Department Of Agriculture.

No illnesses have been reported to date in animals or humans in connection with this problem.

What to Do?

Consumers are urged to return the recalled product to the place of purchase for a full refund. Those with questions may contact Kasel Associated Industries at 1-800-218-4417 Monday thru Friday from 7am to 5pm MDT.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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Dog Food Recall – Updated February 2, 2012

Here is an e-mail I was sent by signing up for their alerts here.  These brands were recalled earlier, but this is an update to the recall:

According to the Associated Press, Advanced Animal Nutrition of Thayer, Missouri has today announced a voluntary dog food recall involving three of its products due to contamination with aflatoxin.

The event was initially announced by the FDA on December 8, 2011 and later updated by a second news bulletin dated December 13, 2011 (republished February 2, 2012).

The recall includes the 50-pound bags of the following products:

  • Dog Power Hunters Formula 27-14
  • Dog Power Adult Maintenance Formula 21-12
  • Dog Power Hi-Pro Performance Formula 26-18

The contaminated products were apparently distributed in Missouri, Arkansas and Louisiana.

Aflatoxin is a toxin produced by a certain species of mold commonly found in cereal grains.

The affected products originally included Lot Codes K0004 through K1322. However, the updated bulletin now includes Lot Codes 4K1004 through 4K1322.

What to Watch For

According to the above FDA news release…

“Pets that have consumed any of the above recalled products and exhibit symptoms of illness including sluggishness or lethargy combined with a reluctance to eat, vomiting, yellowish tint to the eyes or gums, or diarrhea should be seen by a veterinarian.”

What to Do

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Advanced Animal Nutrition has suggested consumers return the recalled dog food to the store where it was bought for a full refund.

Chicken Jerky Recall

Just a quick post that there is a recall of some Chicken Jerky treats.  Don’t panic if you feed the Dogswell or Catswell treats, they are safe.

Here is the FDA article on what you need to watch out for.  If your pet has been ill and these seem to be he symptoms, you now know why.  A visit to the vet might be a good idea as well.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is again cautioning consumers that chicken jerky products for dogs (also sold as chicken tenders, strips or treats) may be associated with illness in dogs. In the last 12 months, FDA has seen an increase in the number of complaints it received of dog illnesses associated with consumption of chicken jerky products imported from China. These complaints have been reported to FDA by dog owners and veterinarians.

FDA issued a cautionary warning regarding chicken jerky products to consumers in September 2007 and a Preliminary Animal Health Notification in December of 2008. After seeing the number of complaints received drop off during the latter part of 2009 and most of 2010, the FDA is once again seeing the number of complaints rise to the levels of concern that prompted release of our earlier warnings.

Chicken jerky products should not be substituted for a balanced diet and are intended to be fed occasionally in small quantities.

FDA is advising consumers who choose to feed their dogs chicken jerky products to watch their dogs closely for any or all of the following signs that may occur within hours to days of feeding the products: decreased appetite; decreased activity; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; increased water consumption and/or increased urination. If the dog shows any of these signs, stop feeding the chicken jerky product. Owners should consult their veterinarian if signs are severe or persist for more than 24 hours. Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine). Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose). Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

FDA, in addition to several animal health diagnostic laboratories in the U.S., is working to determine why these products are associated with illness in dogs. FDA’s Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (VLRN) is now available to support these animal health diagnostic laboratories. To date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses. FDA continues extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified a contaminant.

The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem and its origin. Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky. Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their state or go to their website.